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Posts tagged ‘face-to-face’

Home Health Conditions for Payment


We have looked and have been unable to find specific guidance on the new CoPs.  There was a phone conference scheduled with NGS that was cancelled and nothing so far from Palmetto GBA.  Help us out if you know anything.

Meanwhile, some people who are very knowledgeable and well respected in the industry differ from us in how we interpret what ‘estimating how much longer the patient will be on service at the time of recertification’ means.  Look for it below in larger bold text.

§424.22   Requirements for home health services.

Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health services only if a physician certifies and recertifies the content specified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (b)(2) of this section, as appropriate.

(a) Certification—(1) Content of certification. As a condition for payment of home health services under Medicare Part A or Medicare Part B, a physician must certify the patient’s eligibility for the home health benefit, as outlined in sections 1814(a)(2)(C) and 1835(a)(2)(A) of the Act, as follows in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) through (v) of this section. The patient’s medical record, as specified in paragraph (c) of this section, must support the certification of eligibility as outlined in paragraph (a)(1)(i) through (v) of this section.

(i) The individual needs or needed intermittent skilled nursing care, or physical therapy or speech-language pathology services as defined in §409.42(c) of this chapter. If a patient’s underlying condition or complication requires a registered nurse to ensure that essential non-skilled care is achieving its purpose, and necessitates a registered nurse be involved in the development, management, and evaluation of a patient’s care plan, the physician will include a brief narrative describing the clinical justification of this need. If the narrative is part of the certification form, then the narrative must be located immediately prior to the physician’s signature. If the narrative exists as an addendum to the certification form, in addition to the physician’s signature on the certification form, the physician must sign immediately following the narrative in the addendum.

(ii) Home health services are or were required because the individual is or was confined to the home, as defined in sections 1835(a) and 1814(a) of the Act, except when receiving outpatient services.

(iii) A plan for furnishing the services has been established and will be or was periodically reviewed by a physician who is a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, or podiatric medicine, and who is not precluded from performing this function under paragraph (d) of this section. (A doctor of podiatric medicine may perform only plan of treatment functions that are consistent with the functions he or she is authorized to perform under State law.)

(iv) The services will be or were furnished while the individual was under the care of a physician who is a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, or podiatric medicine.

(v) A face-to-face patient encounter, which is related to the primary reason the patient requires home health services, occurred no more than 90 days prior to the home health start of care date or within 30 days of the start of the home health care and was performed by a physician or allowed non-physician practitioner as defined in paragraph (a)(1)(v)(A) of this section. The certifying physician must also document the date of the encounter as part of the certification.

(A) The face-to-face encounter must be performed by one of the following:

(1) The certifying physician himself or herself.

(2) A physician, with privileges, who cared for the patient in an acute or post-acute care facility from which the patient was directly admitted to home health.

(3) A nurse practitioner or a clinical nurse specialist (as those terms are defined in section 1861(aa)(5) of the Act) who is working in accordance with State law and in collaboration with the certifying physician or in collaboration with an acute or post-acute care physician with privileges who cared for the patient in the acute or post-acute care facility from which the patient was directly admitted to home health.

(4) A certified nurse midwife (as defined in section 1861(gg) of the Act) as authorized by State law, under the supervision of the certifying physician or under the supervision of an acute or post-acute care physician with privileges who cared for the patient in the acute or post-acute care facility from which the patient was directly admitted to home health.

(5) A physician assistant (as defined in section 1861(aa)(5) of the Act) under the supervision of the certifying physician or under the supervision of an acute or post-acute care physician with privileges who cared for the patient in the acute or post-acute care facility from which the patient was directly admitted to home health.

(B) The face-to-face patient encounter may occur through telehealth, in compliance with section 1834(m) of the Act and subject to the list of payable Medicare telehealth services established by the applicable physician fee schedule regulation.

(1) Timing and signature. The certification of need for home health services must be obtained at the time the plan of care is established or as soon thereafter as possible and must be signed and dated by the physician who establishes the plan.

(2) [Reserved]

(2) [Reserved]

(b) Recertification—(1) Timing and signature of recertification. Recertification is required at least every 60 days when there is a need for continuous home health care after an initial 60-day episode. Recertification should occur at the time the plan of care is reviewed, and must be signed and dated by the physician who reviews the plan of care. Recertification is required at least every 60 days unless there is a—

(i) Beneficiary elected transfer; or

(ii) Discharge with goals met and/or no expectation of a return to home health care.

(2) Content and basis of recertification. The recertification statement must indicate the continuing need for services and estimate how much longer the services will be required. Need for occupational therapy may be the basis for continuing services that were initiated because the individual needed skilled nursing care or physical therapy or speech therapy. If a patient’s underlying condition or complication requires a registered nurse to ensure that essential non-skilled care is achieving its purpose, and necessitates a registered nurse be involved in the development, management, and evaluation of a patient’s care plan, the physician will include a brief narrative describing the clinical justification of this need. If the narrative is part of the recertification form, then the narrative must be located immediately prior to the physician’s signature. If the narrative exists as an addendum to the recertification form, in addition to the physician’s signature on the recertification form, the physician must sign immediately following the narrative in the addendum.

(c) Determining patient eligibility for Medicare home health services. Documentation in the certifying physician’s medical records and/or the acute/post-acute care facility’s medical records (if the patient was directly admitted to home health) shall be used as the basis for certification of home health eligibility. This documentation shall be provided upon request to the home health agency, review entities, and/or CMS. Criteria for patient eligibility are described in paragraphs (a)(1) and (b) of this section. If the documentation used as the basis for the certification of eligibility is not sufficient to demonstrate that the patient is or was eligible to receive services under the Medicare home health benefit, payment will not be rendered for home health services provided.

(d) Limitation of the performance of physician certification and plan of care functions. The need for home health services to be provided by an HHA may not be certified or recertified, and a plan of care may not be established and reviewed, by any physician who has a financial relationship as defined in §411.354 of this chapter, with that HHA, unless the physician’s relationship meets one of the exceptions in section 1877 of the Act, which sets forth general exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and compensation; exceptions to the referral prohibition related to ownership or investment interests; and exceptions to the referral prohibition related to compensation arrangements.

(1) If a physician has a financial relationship as defined in §411.354 of this chapter, with an HHA, the physician may not certify or recertify need for home health services provided by that HHA, establish or review a plan of treatment for such services, or conduct the face-to-face encounter required under sections 1814(a)(2)(C) and 1835(a)(2)(A) of the Act unless the financial relationship meets one of the exceptions set forth in §411.355 through §411.357 of this chapter.

(2) A Nonphysician practitioner may not perform the face-to-face encounter required under sections 1814(a)(2)(C) and 1835(a)(2)(A) of the Act if such encounter would be prohibited under paragraph (d)(1) if the nonphysician practitioner were a physician.

[53 FR 6638, Mar. 2, 1988; 53 FR 12945, Apr. 20, 1988; 56 FR 8845, Mar. 1, 1991, as amended at 65 FR 41211, July 3, 2000; 66 FR 962, Jan. 4, 2001; 70 FR 70334, Nov. 21, 2005; 72 FR 51098, Sept. 5, 2007; 74 FR 58133, Nov. 10, 2009; 75 FR 70463, Nov. 17, 2010; 76 FR 9503, Feb. 18, 2011; 76 FR 68606, Nov. 4, 2011; 77 FR 67163, Nov. 8, 2012; 79 FR 66116, Nov. 6, 2014]

Change on the Horizon


The 2015 update to  Home Health PPS is considerable and provides for major and minor changes, plus a lot of interesting information.  Here’s the bullet points.

Reduction in Payment

No news here.  Everyone was expecting a decrease in payment.  It comes to approximately $81.00 subtracted from the standard episode rate.  The standard episode rate is that dollar amount which is adjusted by OASIS and other factors to find the final payment rate.  In contrast, the per visit rate has gone up slightly. 

Face to Face documentation requirements

A face-to-face document is still required but the narrative section has been removed effective January 1, 2015.  Within the regulations the effect of the Face-to-Face requirement has been described as follows:

  • The error rate for home health claims was calculated to be 17.5 percent.
  • The majority of home health improper payments were due to “insufficient
    documentation” errors. “Insufficient documentation” errors occur when the medical documentation submitted is inadequate to support payment for the services billed or when a specific documentation element that is required (as described above) is missing. Most “insufficient documentation” errors for home health occurred when the narrative portion of the face-to-face encounter documentation did not sufficiently describe how the clinical findings from the encounter supported the beneficiary’s homebound status and need for skilled services, as
    required by §424.22(a)(1)(v).
    • CMS-1611-F  Page 37

ImportantAll episodes beginning with an OASIS Start of Care assessment will require  Face-to-Face documentation.  While the risk of denial related to the narrative has been reduced, agencies will have far more opportunities to make an error.  This includes patients who return to service after being discharged and patients who were in the hospital over day 60 of an episode and must be readmitted for purposes of billing. 

MD/hospital documentation:  The regulations state that if requested, an agency must cough up the hospital’s documentation if the patient was admitted directly from the hospital or the physician’s notes that demonstrates eligibility.  This should be happening already but from reading clinical records, it is obvious that often the nurses caring for the patient are not reading the hospital documentation.  Do not wait until 2015 to add getting the MD records in the chart prior to billing.

Interesting and Important:  I think the following excerpt is saying that if agencies provide the physician with the information to support eligibility, the physician may use it if he or she signs off on it.   This is in stark contrast to not being able to help the physician compose the narrative.  Read for yourself and feel free offer your own opinion.

The initial assessment visit must be done to determine the immediate care and support needs of the patient and to determine eligibility for the Medicare home health benefit, including homebound status. The Medicare CoPs, at §484.55(b), require a comprehensive assessment to be completed in a timely manner, consistent with the patient’s immediate needs, but no later than 5 calendar days after the start of care, and for eligibility for the Medicare home health benefit to be determined, including homebound status. We would expect that the findings
from initial assessment and/or comprehensive assessment of the patient would be communicated to the certifying physician.

The certifying physician can incorporate this information into his/her
medical record for the patient and use it to develop the plan of care and to support his/her certification of patient eligibility. The certifying physician must review and sign off on anything incorporated it into his or her medical record for the patient that is used to substantiate the certification/re-certification of patient eligibility for the home health benefit.

End in Sight

Twice in the Federal Regs, there is a directive that all patients whose care extends into a second episode, must be recertified with a documented estimated end in sight for skilled care.  I really thought I missed something in the proposed regs but Lisa Selman-Holman did not see it, either.  Regardless of who saw what, the directive is in place.  Be careful of ‘statutory’ reasons for denial.  This has the potential to be like dates, signatures, etc.  Once it is identified that a recertification did not meet requirements, a full denial can be issued.

Math

There are some changes to the payment calculations.  I am hoping that someone with a better head for math than myself with go through all the numbers and explain to us the difference.  Consider that a cry for help.

Data Submission

There has always been a provision in the Prospective Payment System for a 2 percent penalty for those agencies that did not submit OASIS data.  Nobody knew what that meant.  Did it mean penalties for no data submission or less than 100% data submission?  It has finally been clarified for agencies as 70% of qualifying episodes in 2015 with gradual increases over the next several years. 

Since it is now a requirement for payment that the OASIS data used to determine payment be in the state repository prior to billing, this new definition strikes us as ‘late’ for lack of a better word.  If you are not sure of your data submission status, call us now. You need help.

Value Based Purchasing

Value Based Purchasing is recycled Pay-for-Performance.  The actual indicators that will factor into any payment adjustments have yet to be determined which was common theme in the P4P predecessor.  Although this is not our first rodeo with the concept of Value Based Purchasing, this one may stick.  Keep your ears to the ground for more information.

These regulations run through 259 pages but like most, there is a lot of fluff and stuff inserted between the good stuff.  Take some time and read through the comments and look at some of the data.  We will be doing so as well and posting anything interesting or important we find.

Good luck.  It’s always an adventure when the regulations are changed.

 

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